Skip to Accessibility Tools Skip to Content Skip to Footer

Asthma Goal Setting

As the year is coming to an end, it’s time to start thinking about next year. This is the time that a lot of people think about New Year’s resolutions that will start in January. I personally think that a lot of resolutions that are set have completely unrealistic expectations which ultimately lead to disappointment and feelings of failure. I know I’ve been there and set super lofty goals that definitely weren’t met. I decided to set goals differently for the upcoming new year. I am going to be setting some asthma-specific goals and I want to encourage you to do the same. Your asthma goals should be specific to you and what you want to realistically accomplish. I’ll give some ideas on this post for possible asthma goals.

Revisit your asthma action plan

I recently wrote a post about giving your asthma action plan a tune-up. Keeping your action plan updated and current is very important. Asthma is an episodic disease that can change over time. The next time you are at your doctor’s office take your action plan with you and go over it with your doctor to see if anything needs to be adjusted or changed. Take some time to really look over your plan and become familiar with it.

Exercise

This goal can seem extremely daunting for asthmatics and often times we shy away from even the word exercise. And for good reason! But I promise you that exercise isn’t impossible even for the most severe asthmatics. Not all exercise is high intensity. There are numerous low-intensity exercises that asthmatics can do that are still effective. Walking is great no matter how slow or brisk the pace. There are also tons of exercises that can be done in a chair, like arm lifts with small weights, leg lifts etc. Yoga and swimming are also low impact things that asthmatics can do. Be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any exercise regimen to be sure it will be beneficial and not detrimental to your asthma.

Keep Track

One goal that I am setting for myself is being better at tracking my asthma. I’ll admit that I haven’t been the best at keeping track of my asthma on paper lately. I will definitely be making it a priority for 2018. Having an asthma/health specific journal will make this so much easier. Some things that you can track are times you take your medication (or a box that you check when you take your medicines at the different times you take them), peak flow readings, symptoms, triggers that you encounter each day, and rescue inhaler usage. This way you will be able to start to see trends with your asthma and be able to take steps to hopefully keep it from spiraling out of control. Take your journal with you to doctors appointments and share it with your medical provider! He/she will be quite impressed!

These are just a few goals that can be set when it comes to asthma specifically. I would love to hear any goals that have worked well for you in the past (or haven’t worked out so great) or ones that you are going to set for the new year!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Asthma.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

Poll