Cooking with gas causing problems?

Cooking With Gas Causing Problems?

We recently moved and have been adjusting to our new home. It’s been a constant stream of: “Mom, where are the towels?” “Has anyone unboxed the toilet paper yet?” “Mom, do we have any extra toothbrushes?” And on and on.

The one thing I don’t like about this house is that we now have a gas cooktop and stove, rather than electric.  I have been cooking on electric stove tops and ovens my entire life, so I wasn’t sure about using gas.

Everyone that I talk to raves about cooking with gas and assured me that I will just LOVE my gas stove.

I don’t.

Why? Well, it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. I’m too used to cooking with an electric cooktop and electric oven. And I don’t like how the flames heat up my nearby cupboards (seriously – they are warm to the touch!)

And I don’t like the smell of the gas.

Did you know that the by-product of cooking with gas (nitrogen dioxide or NO2) can be an asthma trigger

The National Institutes of Health U.S. Library of Medicine has a study called “Indoor Combustion and Asthma.”  It claims no affect between gas fumes and asthma.

The study says, “Among 349 adult asthmatics in California, there was no apparent association of gas cooking with any of the health outcomes: asthma severity; physical health status; asthma quality of life; emergency department visits; or hospital admissions.”

However, a study from the UK says, “…gas cooking was positively associated with asthma symptoms and asthma attacks among women”

It also says the women in the UK report wheezing, waking up with shortness of breathe, asthma attacks and the need to use asthma medicine. It also says women who cook with gas have lower lung function.

As you can see, everyone with asthma is different. Some people are just fine cooking with gas. My lungs, however, have been very cranky since we moved in and they have let me know that in no uncertain terms!

I caught a whiff of gas last night while the Hubster was cooking dinner, and immediately started the tickle in my throat, then the cough, then the tight chest. Here we go again! I used my inhaler and turned on the fans above the stove as well as in the living room to try to air out the rooms.

For me, I know my body and know that I was fine – UNTIL I smelled the gas. Then the asthma attack started instantly.

So, what’s right for you? Everyone with asthma is different. Maybe gas doesn’t bother you, but it bothers me!

So, the gas stove is coming out and we are headed to the store to get a new electric stove.

I have plenty of other asthma triggers (cats, dogs, trees, flowers, grass, cold temperatures, perfumes, etc) And I know that the best thing for asthma is to try to avoid your asthma triggers. So this means I will have to buy a new stove top and oven.

Am I alone in this?

Anyone else have problems with cooking in gas stoves?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Asthma.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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