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Faxing My Doctors Office—Again.

Remember that time two years ago when I faxed my doctor’s office because it was the 80s, and as such, we have no better technological means for efficient textual communications?

Well, gather ‘round, friends, as I am back with more tales to tell from the Land of the Facsimile!

Famous last words

“Just call when you need a prescription and I’ll send one.” said Dr. Smartypants as I left her office with 56 puffs of Spiriva also known as 28 days but actually less, due to the couple times I actuated the inhaler onto my hand by accident.
Just call. Yeah, right. Famous last words. You know what happened when I last had to “just call” the outpatient respiratory clinic? I had to leave a message and it took 3 weeks for them to call me back to rebook an appointment I forgot to go to and instead went to the zoo.
I figured I would be trying to chase down this prescription by phone for more days than I have medicine left. And then, I had the classic Aha Moment.

Faxing my doctors office—again

Again, I felt ridiculous as I opened Microsoft Word and had to search for a Fax template. It’s 2018—almost 2019! It’s not like we are pre-Y2K or anything here. I drafted a quick fax with the comments reading:

Hello,
Dr. [Smartypants] provided samples of Spiriva Respimat at my last clinic appointment and said to call for a prescription to be sent to my pharmacy [pharmacy name].
Please provide this request to have her process the prescription for me as soon as possible.
If you have any questions, please phone me at [cell number].
Thank you,
—Kerri MacKay

I uploaded the document to good ol’ HelloFax.com, and sent it off at 11:51 am, curious as to how efficient this blast-to-the-past communication method would fare at this clinic.

At 2:32 pm my cell phone rang, and, I’ll be! It was my doctor’s office! I did have to re-explain to the woman calling that, no I could not just have the pharmacy fax them because I do not have the prescription on file, and that they at the doctor’s office needed to send it in. I have done that pharmacy run around game before! But sure enough, however, this entirely backwards system of me faxing my doctors office now has a 2 for 2 success rate, and has thus far proven to be far more efficient than making phone calls.

This is the third, perhaps fourth, time in my life I have had to send a fax. And, as I lamented in my first post on the subject, it would be far too efficient if I could just send a nice, normal e-mail like other people can. But no, instead, I the patient have to resort to the fax-machine-less facsimile to have some semblance of efficiency.

Well, it’s better than having to go all the way there—and with a two-and-a-half hour response time, that’s pretty impressive in the world of medical communications!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Asthma.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Shellzoo
    3 months ago

    I am lucky because my primary doctor has My Chart so I can get into my chart online and request refills or leave a message for my doctor. My asthma/allergy doctor has a nurse line that I can call for refills or questions and they answer back before the end of the day. Both my physicians send my refills and prescriptions electronically to my pharmacy which they keep on file. I would be lost sending a fax.

  • Leon Lebowitz, RRT moderator
    3 months ago

    Hi Shellzoo and thanks for your post. It sounds like you have everything just the way you need it at the physician’s offices you are connected to. Keep up the good work! Leon (site moderator)

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