Asthma Lexicon: Sputum Terms To Know

So, this is kind of a gross topic. But, when you have asthma, it’s good to know about asthma sputum. What you’re spitting up can say a lot about what’s going on inside your lungs.

Terms to know about asthma sputum:

Mucus

This is a sticky, slimy substance secreted by goblet cells lining airways. It contains mostly water. It lubricates airways. It prevents airways from drying out. It also traps unwanted particles and pathogens. It’s part of your immune system to keep your lungs free and clear of germs. Along with water, mucus also contains mucin.1-2

Mucin

It’s a sticky protein. It makes mucus sticky. So, when it mixes with water, it makes it sticky. Therefore, it’s the main ingredient your body uses to make mucus.1-2

Goblet cells

These are cells randomly scattered along airways. They store mucus. They secrete mucus when needed. As part of airway remodeling, asthmatics may have an abnormally large amount of goblet cells. 3

Hypersecretion

This is when goblet cells overproduce mucus. It may be because asthmatics tend to have more goblet cells than normal. It may also occur as part of the asthma response. Exposure to asthma triggers causes goblet cells to overproduce mucus. 2

Obstruction

Along with bronchospasm, excessive mucus may cause airways to become narrowed. This “obstructs” the flow of air through airways. This can make you feel short of breath. It may also make you cough (defined below).

Mucus plug

It’s when mucus gets thick and blocks airways. It’s a thick, sticky block of mucus. It may occur during acute and severe asthma attacks. It may occur due to hypersecretion. They may also be caused by an increase in white blood cells called eosinophils in asthmatic airways.4-5

Secretions

Another term for lots of phlegm in your airways. It may produce lung sounds called crackles or rhonchi.

Sputum

It’s a term for sputum when it’s present in large amounts. It’s what mucus is called when it enters your upper airway. It contains a mixture of both mucus and saliva. It’s what you cough up, swallow, or spit-up.

Phlegm

Another term for sputum.

A cough

When moved to the back of your throat, phlegm may trigger the cough reflex. This is what makes you forcibly move air through your vocal cords. This can help dislodge and move up sputum further up your airway. This allows you to either spit it up or swallow it. Swallowed phlegm is destroyed by stomach acids.3

Increased mucus can be a symptom of asthma. So, this makes a cough one of the more common signs of asthma. The sputum you cough up can help a doctor diagnose what’s triggering your asthma. So, your doctor may want a sample.

Sputum Induction

This is where your doctor has you produce a sputum sample.

Sputum Sample

You will be given a cup that is sterile inside. It’s best that you take precautions when removing the lid. You don’t want to accidentally contaminate it with germs from your environment. You will want to generate a sample from deep inside your lungs. Spit it into the cup. Place the lid securely on top.

Expectorate

This is a fancy term that means “to spit out phlegm. It means to remove phlegm from your airways by spitting it out. You’ll need to do this to produce a sputum sample.

Laboratory tech

A laboratory will collect your sputum sample. This person will run tests on your sputum. This will determine if it is contaminated with bacteria. If a bacteria is present, your doctor may order an antibiotic.

Now you know!

What to make of this? We asthmatics are often asked to produce sputum samples. We are exposed to a variety of terms, such as those listed above. Now you know what they mean.

Are there any other terms you'd like to learn more about? Let me know in the comments below!

Join the Asthma.net community

By providing your email address, you are agreeing to our privacy policy. We never sell or share your email address.

More on this topic

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Asthma.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Join the conversation

or create an account to comment.