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Stranger to asthma

Well, as a child I remember always having lots of colds, coughing spells and chest pain much often, but took it lightly since I wasn’t used to visiting hospitals or clinics. Often my dad will always treat it at home with ginger and sugar and other ointments, anytime it surfaced.

So, my symptoms got worse

As I grew up, though I still had severe symptoms of cold during the harmattan and other unfavorable weather seasons which I know now might have been undiagnosed rhinitis, never took them seriously because the chest pain became almost nonexistent and the coughs got less bothersome. Took it to be effects of changes in the weather. Until late in the year 2017, shortly after my 24th birthday, I found it harder an harder to breathe as days went by, and no matter how hard I tried to cure that feeling at home, I just couldn’t. Even to the extent that I could get so breathless that I will be unable to utter a complete word without taking a breath into my very tight chest. Wheezing became totally absent and it felt as if I would die the next minute. If not for God’s intervention, I probably wouldn’t have been alive by now.

Took action

So I took action and went to see a doctor, then I was told the saddest but realistic news of being a chronic asthmatic. I have since then being given a Ventolin, oral steroids n preventers when it is getting out of control. I am barely two years at this disease so don’t understand much of some of the symptoms that go on in my body, will need much help there. Now I am always afraid to do strenuous activities because I don’t know what might happen, an don’t want to risk it. I also feel embarrassed having to carry about an inhaler everywhere I go and use it, even in the midst of people? I don’t think I have come to terms with being asthmatic yet. I don’t know when this will happen, or if it ever will. Thanx!

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Comments

  • BBdgh
    2 weeks ago

    I’ve just returned home after a fabulous vacation. What I’ve learned is if I try to keep up with others my group my breathing deteriorates exponentially. Good friends would slow their pace, but I could see they were anxious to get moving. I felt guilty holding them back. The resolution was I would walk my pace and we would meet up at specified locations. I could then go my own pace, ambling. Slower than walking, faster then sauntering. Needing to sit and rest less frequent. I did see less of the tourist attractions, but I felt healthy and strong, and I could last longer. This is also a bit scary as I’m on my own in a strange city and I miss out on the comradery of being with the group. But I didn’t feel like I was about to die. The hardest part is learning to listen to your body and then following what it says.

  • Leon Lebowitz, RRT moderator
    2 weeks ago

    Hi BBdgh and thanks for your post. How wonderful for you that your vacation was enjoyable and you were able to manage your condition while away. By knowing your asthma so well, you’ve now proven to yourself that you can keep it under control as long as you listen to what your body is telling you. Sure, it would be great to have the camaraderie of your companions, but I’ll be breathing well felt even better. Plus, once you did catch up with them at the specified locations. I got a real ‘chuckle’ from your explanation of ‘ambling’. Keep up the good work! Leon (site moderator)

  • Lyn Harper, RRT moderator
    2 weeks ago

    Hi BBdgh – I’m so happy to hear you had a great vacation! There’s nothing like a little time away to restore the soul. It’s sounds like you and your friends came to a very happy compromise and it worked for everyone. You were still able to do what you wanted and so were they, everyone at their own pace. Good for you! – Best, Lyn (site moderator)

  • BBdgh
    2 months ago

    It is hard to realize what you are experiencing isn’t what a normal person does. Then you use your inhaler and it makes it better. I’m finally figuring it out sooner. Now to remember to let the MD know when I’m using the inhaler pretty often. A work in progress.

  • Leon Lebowitz, RRT moderator
    2 months ago

    Hi BBdgh and thanks for your post. It certainly does take some adjustments getting used to asthma, it’s symptoms and treatment. You will find, I’m sure, the more you know, the better able you will be to manage the condition, in concert with your physician. We’re happy to help in any way that we can. We’re glad to have you as a member of our online community. All the best, Leon (site moderator)

  • PaagaLouisa author
    5 months ago

    Well, tanx for the comment too. I don’t know much about yoga or the kind of exercise I should be doing, neither have I found out. I only take about a 15 to 30minutes walk a few times in a week. When I walk for a longer time, I could get either a mild or a provoking chest pain and feel very tired. But I will try to find out if there is another tolerable exercise I can do except, 30min walks n also find out how yoga is done.

  • faith7
    5 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your story. I have a similar situation with my health. I am just now getting diagnosed. I hope you are to find out a exercise you can do. I read that yoga is helpful

  • Leon Lebowitz, RRT moderator
    5 months ago

    Hi PaagaLouisa, and thanks for your post. I am sorry for the delay in responding as our site usually tries to reply to all posts within a day or so.
    Welcome to asthma.net! We are devoted to all things asthma and asthma related so you’ve come to the right place!
    Please take some time to familiarize yourself with our website as we have a wealth of helpful information that should assist you in becoming more familiar with this new condition (for you).
    If there is anything we can do to guide you, please do not hesitate to let us know.
    As well, you may want to check us out on our asthma Facebook page (the link is at the bottom of this page). You will find many of our members interacting there about their concerns with this condition.
    We are glad you are here!
    Leon (site moderator)

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