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Coping with Asthma

"No, I'll keep it with me, thank you."

  • By Sugarfoot

    I keep my “puffer” (rescue breather) with me at all times. When I go to a Dr. or medical facility: often the nurse or assistant wants to take my puffer & lay it on a shelf, or desk. I’m not comfortable with that & every time they offer to put my rescue breather “…out of the way…” I object & say, “No, I’ll keep it with me, thank you.” Anyone else encounter this issue? How do you handle it?

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  • By Richard Faust

    Thanks for the question Sugarfoot. My personal thought is that you should do whatever makes you comfortable. The doctor’s office should recognize that an asthmatic may want to keep their inhaler on their person, not to mention avoid the risk of additional germs from someone else handling it. If anyone has an issue with you saying no to such a request, that is on them. After all, it is you personal property.

    If you want additional feedback you may want to try the community Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/asthmadotnet/. Best, Richard (Asthma.net Team)

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, RRT Moderator

    This is a great topic, Sugarfoot! And I see that Richard has not only commented positively, but also suggested you visit our Facebook page where you’ll receive many other comments from our community members.
    I’m wondering for what reason your doctor’s office staff (nurses, assistants) want to take your inhaler from you. If they need to know a list of your current medications, you can certainly provide that to them! But why take your inhaler?
    All the best, Leon (site moderator)

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  • By Sugarfoot

    Thank you Richard & Leon. Your replies really blessed me. All my Dr. offices have a list of my medical issues & medications so why would they behave in that manner? Even if they’ve ignored information: common sense would dictate if a person is asthmatic & carries an inhaler let them keep it with them. It’s not just a personal item it can be their lifeline. Thanks again, I have tears in my eyes because you are so kind & you do understand. Perhaps medical people need more training. A child in Canada died when his rescue breather was locked in the principals office & it couldn’t be reached in time to help the young man. The fall-out was his parents working tirelessly to try to insure this never happens to another Canadian school child.

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, RRT Moderator

    Hi (again) Sugarfoot. That’s a very sad and tragic story about the school child who passed because his inhaler couldn’t be retrieved in time for his to use.

    As for your physician’s office, you may want to inquiry of them the next time you are there as to what their intentions are when they ask you for your inhaler.
    Warm regards,
    Leon (site moderator)

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