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Does anyone remember amiodarone? What does it do?



Used in the 1950s and early 1960s. Took about two hours to work. That was a brand name; for what, I don't know. A bronchodilator of some sort.

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  1. Amiodarone is an arrhythmic drug. It's used to treat heart arrhythmias. Are you aware of it once being used for asthma? Just curious. John. Community Moderator. asthma.net

    1. Hi CharlieY, and thanks for your post. As my colleague, John, has said, I know of this medication, Amiodarone, in the treatment of various cardiac arrhythmias.

      I am not familiar with it being used in the treatment of asthma.

      Are you able to shed any more light on this for us?

      Wishing you well,
      Leon (site moderator asthma.net)

      1. Hi again, CharlieY, and thanks for your reply and explanation. I'm not quite sure which medication you are referring to - even with the phonetic type spelling, it's not ringing a bell. I do remember the medication "Tedral", which was a combination of three different drugs. That pill also had a bitter taste.

        Perhaps my colleague, John, will see your response and have some other ideas about which medication your are thinking of.

        Wishing you well,
        Leon (site moderator COPD.net)

      2. Hi again, CharlieY - please excuse the error in my response (below).
        I signed off incorrectly - I am the moderator of the asthma.net website).

        I appreciate your understanding.
        Regards,
        Leon (site moderator asthma.net)

    2. Sorry for the late response. Your reply was shunted to spam and I just found it. Curious, as I receive the general asthma.net mailings.

      No, amodrine (the spelling is phonetic), was not a heart arrhythmia drug. It was some kind of bronchodilator. My mother was an RN, trained at Rhode Island General, and a head floor nurse at a Ft. Worth hospital when I was a kid. We lived far out in the country, so she treated me herself. Once every two weeks for a number of years we went in to Ft. Worth to see a respiratory MD named Sim Hulsey. I had a reaction to mold, house dust, ragweed, Bermuda grass, et al. I'm certain Dr. Hulsey wrote the prescription. I took this medication for years; carried one in my pocket in case I had an attack at school. I did not suffer from heart arrhythmia, though I do have atria fib now. All I remember is that amodrine was an oval-shaped pink pill with a bitter taste, if you were unfortunate enough to keep it on your tongue too long before swallowing it. It took a long time to work, if an asthma attack was underway. If you took it at the very beginning of symptoms, it worked sooner, of course. It's effects lasted several hours, so if you got ahead of an attack, it worked pretty well. I believe it was a rather light stimulant, as well.

      1. Maybe some elderly respiratory doctor might remember it.

        1. Hi again, CharlieY, and thanks for this post. I wonder if you had an opportunity to see the response at the bottom of this post from four days ago.
          I will copy and paste it here, for your convenience (in quotes): "Hi again, CharlieY, and thanks for your reply and explanation. I’m not quite sure which medication you are referring to – even with the phonetic type spelling, it’s not ringing a bell. I do remember the medication “Tedral”, which was a combination of three different drugs. That pill also had a bitter taste.

          Perhaps my colleague, John, will see your response and have some other ideas about which medication your are thinking of.

          Wishing you well,
          Leon (site moderator asthma.net)"

          What do you think?
          Leon (site moderator asthma.net

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