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post covid ,asthma and blood/gas results

Hi all.
I was diagnosed with asthma 2 years ago and sadly with covid at 14.4.
I don't feel well as time passes,I feel exhausted,very drowsy and have some kind of foggy feeling in brain which is the worse thing.
I also noticed that I have heart arrytmias,for unknown reasons and never had them before.
I was in hospital for Pulmology and they did X-ray for my lungs and doctor told me everything is okay,no pneuomnia.
But I noticed that my p CO2 is lower then usual and PH of blood higher then reference.
Back 6 months ago I started having worse ever possible headaches I did MR of brain,nothing special on it.
So is the low P CO2 expected with asthma.
I also did ABS in blood 2 months ago and results where better,and now worse.
here are my results,and someone please tell me what to do with it?
I'm taking Respiro inhaller 2x2 for asthma and before covid I felt okay,now everyday tired,drowsy,have some fog in brain,I sleep 4-5 h only.





  1. Hi frozen_sun, and thanks for your post. I'm sorry to hear of the challenges you are facing now! You may be aware we cannot provide medical advice or diagnostics over the internet (for your own safety), but your concerns certainly warrant a reply.
    In the most general of terms, asthma has been known to be connected to fatigue, but so are other medical conditions. First, I thought you might gain some additional insight, from this article on that very topic: https://asthma.net/living/is-fatigue-a-symptom-of-asthma. I do hope you find it to be helpful, in a practical way.
    You also mentioned that you are experiencing a kind of 'brain fog', as well as heart arrhythmias. These concerns are best addressed with your physician. These symptoms can also be caused by other medical conditions which your doctor should be aware of and provide you with answers.

    As for the blood gas results you mentioned - have you had an opportunity to discuss them with your doctor as yet? Again, in general, a single arterial blood gas, by itself, gives a window as to ventilation and oxygenation in that moment. This is best addressed by one's physician.
    I realize that much of my response to you is to suggest further investigation into your genuine concerns by your doctor. Your physician will be able to provide a more complete and specific assessment into your particular condition, follow up with diagnoses and appropriate treatment as necessary.
    What do you think?

    Please do check back and let us know how this all turns out for you.
    Wishing you well,
    Leon (site moderator asthma.net)

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